Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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This might finally make momentum stocks attractive again amid the elevated level of uncertainty in the market today. Things have improved a lot for the factor since late last year, according to Bernstein’s McCarthy. Thanks to the more diversified sector composition, correlation among high-momentum stocks has fallen sharply, which means they are less likely to crash together in case of volatility.


Although ETFs are designed to provide investment results that generally correspond to the performance of their respective underlying indices, they may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of the indices because of expenses and other factors. A prospectus contains this and other information about the ETF and should be read carefully before investing. Customers should obtain prospectuses from issuers and/or their third party agents who distribute and make prospectuses available for review. ETFs are required to distribute portfolio gains to shareholders at year end. These gains may be generated by portfolio rebalancing or the need to meet diversification requirements. ETF trading will also generate tax consequences. Additional regulatory guidance on Exchange Traded Products can be found by clicking here.
The solution to both is investing in stock index funds and ETFs. While mutual funds might require a $1,000 minimum or more, index fund minimums tend to be lower (and ETFs are purchased for a share price that could be lower still). Two brokers, Fidelity and Charles Schwab, offer index funds with no minimum at all. Index funds also cure the diversification issue because they hold many different stocks within a single fund.

Trend Score is our proprietary combination of technical factors reduced to a signal number that allows us to quickly identify stocks on the move. Factors include Moving Averages, Wilder's DMI (ADX), Aroon and MACD. We combine the scores for each of these indicators into a composite score that ranges from 0 to 6 that shows how strongly a stock is trending in a bullish direction.
How much money should I invest in stocks? If you’re investing through funds — have we mentioned this is our preference? — you can allocate a fairly large portion of your portfolio toward stock funds, especially if you have a long time horizon. A 30-year-old investing for retirement might have 80% of his or her portfolio in stock funds; the rest would be in bond funds. Individual stocks are another story. We’d recommend keeping these to 10% or less of your investment portfolio.
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