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The solution to both is investing in stock index funds and ETFs. While mutual funds might require a $1,000 minimum or more, index fund minimums tend to be lower (and ETFs are purchased for a share price that could be lower still). Two brokers, Fidelity and Charles Schwab, offer index funds with no minimum at all. Index funds also cure the diversification issue because they hold many different stocks within a single fund.
During its latest rebalance, the Invesco S&P 500 Momentum ETF (SPMO) halved its exposure to the tech sector from 36.6% to 17.2%, and more than doubled the weight in health care to 27.9%. Utilities and real estate went from nearly zero to 11.7% and 7.1% of the portfolios, respectively. That helps explain the fund’s moderate loss of 1.7% in May, even though the tech stocks within the S&P 500 slumped a much steeper 5.7%.
Books provide a wealth of information and are inexpensive compared to the costs of classes, seminars, and educational DVDs sold across the web. Here on the site we have a full list of 20 great stock trading books for investors to consider. My personal all-time favorite is How to Make Money in Stocks by William O’Neil, founder of CANSLIM Trading which is pictured below.
This section lists the number of stocks that have advanced and declined for the day with the volume of shares traded, as well as the number of new 52-week high and low stocks for each of the exchanges. The numbers include all active stocks for that day. For U.S. Markets, only NYSE and NASDAQ stocks are included, excluding ETF's. NYSE and NASDAQ stocks also exclude unit investment trusts, closed end funds, warrant stocks, preferred securities and any non-SIC classified stock. For Canadian Markets, only TSX and TSX-V stocks are included.